fbpx
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on stumbleupon
Share on pinterest
Share on whatsapp
Share on email
Instagram Copyright Hoax

Instagram Copyright Hoax

People are taking the recent Facebook privacy scandals very seriously, but this time it’s on Instagram. A fake, viral copyright post has made its way to celebrities from the likes of Rob Lowe, Taraji P. Henson, Julia Roberts, and many others. Celebrities aren’t the only ones getting fooled by this note, however. Thousands of Instagram users all over the world have posted the screen grab, proving that people fall for just about anything.

The note

If you still haven’t seen the copyright notice on any of your friends’ stories or posts, it says the following:

“Don’t forget Deadline tomorrow !!! Everything you’ve ever posted becomes public from tomorrow. Even messages that have been deleted or the photos not allowed. It costs nothing for a simple copy and paste, better safe than sorry. Channel 13 News talked about the change in Instagram’s privacy policy. I do not give Instagram or any entities associated with Facebook permission to use my pictures, information, messages or posts, both past and future. With this statement, I give notice to Instagram it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, or take any other action against me based on this profile and/or its contents. … NOTE: Instagram is now a public entity. All members must post a note like this. If you prefer, you can copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once it will be tacitly allowing the use of your photos, as well as the information contained in the profile status updates.”

Fake news

While the intentions here are good, the note just doesn’t make much sense, grammatically or legally. Furthermore, it’s been on the Internet since 2012, and it has resurfaced to the public eye once more. 

“There’s no truth to this post,” said Stephanie Otway, a spokesperson for Facebook. For those of you who might have forgotten, Facebook owns Instagram, which could be a reason behind why people posting the note might think it will protect their profiles if needed.

The main reason why this post doesn’t make any sense is because it doesn’t line up with Instagram’s privacy policies. In their guidelines, Instagram states that they “do not claim ownership of your content, but you grant us a license to use it.” Everyone on Instagram agreed to this when they checked the box saying so. Though Instagram can use your information if needed (for example, in a legal matter), that doesn’t mean they will. This is another classic case of people believing in something simply because other people are doing it.

Don’t be that person

If you are still considering posting this on your account, refrain from doing so. It won’t do anything to protect you, as the note is seven years old and not up-to-date with any sort of term or condition. Don’t be that guy or girl that posts a fake copyright notice!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe for more

halloween marketing; witch flying full moon spooky tree

Halloween Marketing

Just because a holiday occurs, it doesn’t mean your successful marketing tactics have to, too. In fact, marketing and advertising on holidays is arguably more

Read More »

Our Latest Work

Take a peek inside our Wonderworld

F.A.Q.

Frequently Asked Questions

Some of the most common questions, along with the complete answers from our social media support experts.

On your LinkedIn profile, there is a button toward the bottom of your profile that says, “Link Facebook.” When you click here, you will be asked for your Facebook information. When you do this, you can easily connect everything together.

On your LinkedIn profile, go to your profile drop down menu in the top right hand corner. Open it and click on “Privacy and Settings.” Directly under “Settings” in the top right hand corner, click on “Manage your Twitter Settings.” This will bring you to another page which invites you to add your Twitter information.

Go to your profile and click “lists.” Create a short description for each list, then add different Twitter accounts. You can decide whether you want them to be public or private.

On your homepage, find groups. In the top right hand corner, there will be a button that says, “create group.” Click on this and make a group and add descriptions and invite people to be a part of it.

Still have questions?

NEED AN EXPERT?

contact us

[contact-form-7 id="2684" html_class="cf7_custom_style_1"]